Без рубрики

AN ESSAY

16.12.2015 — by VD

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Без рубрики

AN ESSAY

16.12.2015 — by VD

Few days ago I discovered an amazing drawing by Robert Dighton. I found a deep idea inside his masterpiece “An essay on woman”. The drawing was created in XVIII century, that was the time of crinoline and ball dresses, beautiful accessories and bright lingerie. I was amused with the contrast of life and death on a masterpiece of times when everything seemed perfect – rococo was an expression of heaven on Earth. The idea that  people were actually thinking about death as an inevitable factor was real. We are used to go to museums and stare at fine art which represents humans’ bodies and the beauty of life. But we never see the physical ugliness of death on pictures. All we see is portraits of kings and queens, wars and other thematics which were allowed during different periods of time. Here we stare at the half of a woman – her beautiful dress and hair. She seems really happy, she plays games and wears prettiest accessories -but what is on the other side? Nothing. The other half is the ugly and skinny skeleton which holds an arrow, which is directed straight to the ground. Isn’t it tragically beautiful ? I find his art really deep and exciting. Let’s speak about the life of Robert.
tumblr_nx0tmtdD2l1qbwdm8o1_540He was born in 1751 in London, the son of a print dealer. He first exhibited at the London Society of Artists in 1769, showing portrait drawings. Dighton entered the Schools of the Royal Academy in 1772, and exhibited in several Academy exhibitions over the two decades from 1775. His musical career had started by 1776, when a newspaper described his performance in the Haymarket. His singing career continued at such venues as Covent Garden and Sadler’s Wells until 1800. The first prints Dighton designed were to illustrate an edition of William Shakespeare’s (1564-1616) works, published in 1775-6, and depictions of actors in a book on the English theater published 1776-7. Portraits of actors done in mezzotint to Dighton’s designs appeared in 1779, followed by a “Book of Heads”. The print publisher Carington Bowles (1724-1793) hired Dighton in 1780, after the death of his previous designer, the painter John Collett (ca. 1725-1780). A profusion of mezzotints and engravings after Dighton designs appeared over the next two decades, including comic images, caricatures and portraits of the grandees of the day and sporting and theatrical scenes. He also painted a number of watercolors in the 1790s, many of which were published as engravings. Dighton died in London in 1814. He died more than 200 years ago, but his art still makes sense. (information of the last paragraph taken :Selected bibliography: Clayton, Timothy. “Dighton, Robert (1751–1814),” Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. Van Camp, An. ‘Robert Dighton and his spurious collectors’ marks on Rembrandt prints in the British Museum, London’, The Burlington Magazine, vol. 155, mo. 1319 (February 2013), p. 88-94.)6250307128030050 800px-Geography_Bewitched_-_England

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